Friday, 26 June 2015

On Becoming A Boxercise Instructor

Last weekend I spent a day at Brunel University taking my Boxercise Instructor qualification. It was a full but fun day and I learnt an awful lot! I'd been to Brunel University some years ago when I was trying to decide which ones to apply to so it was fun to be back on campus. It's somewhat smarter than when I was last there but felt familiar all the same.
After class. I thought I was smiling. I was apparently too tired!

So what is Boxercise?

Boxercise is a boxing based form of exercise. It doesn't involved getting hit (unless you're unlucky) and isn't promoted as a "pure" sport so is a fun, stress busting activity to suit anyone who wants to enjoy boxing training. There are over Boxercise Classes up and down the country and many Personal Trainers use the principles too. It's an effective form of cross-training as it combines both aerobic and anaerobic energy systems and helps to improve hand-eye co-ordination, balance and timing.

What's involved in becoming an instructor?

The basic course is 8 hours long. You are taught the stance, how to move and the eight punches. Teaching points and coaching methods are introduced and then it's time to understand how to hold pads to receive punches. There's a lot of time to practice instructing each other and different combinations. We learnt about the different types of gloves, pads and wraps. My wraps turned my hands yellow! Around the middle of the afternoon you're assessed and the last hour or so is spent trying out different styles of classes. I ended up seriously hot and sweaty but giggling from the last exercise involving We Will Rock you and burpees.

Do you need experience to become an instructor or to take part in a class?

No. Absolutely not. I had next to no experience of boxing before I attended the class but there were people with a solid background in boxing or MMA. It allows for all sorts and many different styles of classes. 
If you want to attend a class, likewise, you don't need previous experience. your instructor will be able to teach you the basics and you can build on this week on week. Some training centres may ask you to attend an induction session before taking part in Boxercise classes so you can learn the basics in a more relaxed environment.

So what are you going to do with these new skills?

Firstly I'm going to practice! I'm new to this myself so I've still got to improve my technique, but I have the skills and resources with which to do this. I'm taking part in a few more classes at Box Bell Fit and in a couple of months I will start to pick up classes to teach. I'm also looking forward to using Boxercise with some of my PT clients, if appropriate.
A host of newly-qualified Boxercise Instructors
Have you ever done a Boxercise class? Was it more aerobic or boot camp in style? Any evil drills you remember?

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